Heat Stress Advisory

 

Heat Index Temp

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Outdoor workers who are exposed to hot and humid conditions are at risk of heat-related illness. The risk of heat-related illness becomes greater as the weather gets hotter and more humid. This situation is particularly serious when hot weather arrives suddenly early in the season, before workers have had a chance to adapt to warm weather.

For people working outdoors in hot weather, both air temperature and humidity affect how hot they feel. The "heat index" is a single value that takes both temperature and humidity into account. The higher the heat index, the hotter the weather feels, since sweat does not readily evaporate and cool the skin. The heat index is a better measure than air temperature alone for estimating the risk to workers from environmental heat sources.

The body normally cools itself by sweating. During hot weather, especially with high humidity, sweating isn't enough. Body temperature can rise to dangerous levels if you don't drink enough water and rest in the shade. You can suffer from heat exhaustion or heat stroke.

Download our new Heat Illness Safety Guide for working safely in the heat this summer!

Click on the underlined links below for more information from OSHA.

OSHA WATER. REST. SHADE  Website 

OSHA Heat Safety Tool / Smartphone App 

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OSHA Work Regimen Guidelines 

Heat IndexRisk LevelProtective Measures
<91°F
Lower (Caution)
  • Provide drinking water
  • Ensure that adequate medical services are available
  • Plan ahead for times when heat index is higher, including worker heat safety training
  • Encourage workers to wear sunscreen
  • Acclimatize workers

If workers must wear heavy protective clothing, perform strenuous activity or work in the direct sun, additional precautions are recommended to protect workers from heat-related illness.*

91°F to 103°F
Moderate

In addition to the steps listed above:

  • Remind workers to drink water often (about 4 cups/hour)**
  • Review heat-related illness topics with workers: how to recognize heat-related illness, how to prevent it, and what to do if someone gets sick
  • Schedule frequent breaks in a cool, shaded area
  • Acclimatize workers
  • Set up buddy system/instruct supervisors to watch workers for signs of heat-related illness

If workers must wear heavy protective clothing, perform strenuous activity or work in the direct sun, additional precautions are recommended to protect workers from heat-related illness.*

  • Schedule activities at a time when the heat index is lower
  • Develop work/rest schedules
  • Monitor workers closely
103°F to 115°FHigh

In addition to the steps listed above:

  • Alert workers of high risk conditions
  • Actively encourage workers to drink plenty of water (about 4 cups/hour)**
  • Limit physical exertion (e.g. use mechanical lifts)
  • Have a knowledgeable person at the worksite who is well-informed about heat-related illness and able to determine appropriate work/rest schedules
  • Establish and enforce work/rest schedules
  • Adjust work activities (e.g., reschedule work, pace/rotate jobs)
  • Use cooling techniques
  • Watch/communicate with workers at all times

When possible, reschedule activities to a time when heat index is lower

>115°FVery High to Extreme

Reschedule non-essential activity for days with a reduced heat index or to a time when the heat index is lower

Move essential work tasks to the coolest part of the work shift; consider earlier start times, split shifts, or evening and night shifts.

Strenuous work tasks and those requiring the use of heavy or non-breathable clothing or impermeable chemical protective clothing should not be conducted when the heat index is at or above 115°F.

If essential work must be done, in addition to the steps listed above:

  • Alert workers of extreme heat hazards
  • Establish water drinking schedule (about 4 cups/hour)**
  • Develop and enforce protective work/rest schedules
  • Conduct physiological monitoring (e.g., pulse, temperature, etc)
  • Stop work if essential control methods are inadequate or unavailable.